sneaky little guest star.

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Rob and I (aka The Scrivening Bartlebys) loved making a joyful ruckus at House of Brews last weekend. Thanks if you were one of the beloved friends who came!

But the best moment might’ve been when this guy crept up on stage… (Can you spot him on the right?)

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Jen Hinst-White

 

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Mostly I’m a writer, but I also
moonlight as a pillow for moppets.

*    *    *

THE NEWEST NEWS:

I have essays forthcoming in Image Journal (November 2017) and Consequence Magazine (winter 2018).

And I’m overjoyed to have been awarded a Sustainable Arts Fellowship at Rivendell Writers’ Colony! I’ll be spending two weeks on Rivendell’s beautiful grounds working on my new novel this November/December.

≈≈≈

And if we’re not yet acquainted:

Hello! I’m Jen. I write. I speak. I like to be alive. I’ve written a novel about tattooing with illustrations (and I’m looking for a great agent or indie press to bring it into the world). I write essays and stories; I review books; occasionally I make a little music or deliver an unconventional sermon for those (like me) who waffle between the skeptics and the mystics. Should we talk? Connect on Twitter? Instagram?

Cheers & love, Jen Hinst-White

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what they did with the grief.

I have never met anyone like them.

andrew

It was just over a year since the 9/11 attacks, and Andrew Rice was still grieving the loss of his brother in the South Tower of the World Trade Center.

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sneak out with us . . .

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Got any plans this Saturday evening?

Rob Hinst and I will be playing live music as The Scrivening Bartlebys this SATURDAY, SEPT. 16, at House of Brews in Port Jefferson, NY.

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empty space.

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(my kitchen)

Sine proprio. It means “without grasping.” It’s Latin, a phrase used in the vows taken by Franciscan friars—or that’s what I learned from my friar friend, anyway.

Specifically, sine proprio is the phrase used for the vow of Poverty. I would’ve thought they’d use a phrase like “without money” for a vow of poverty. But the point isn’t strictly the not-having. It’s the giving-away. For St. Francis and his early followers, sine proprio meant giving away even the ragged clothes from their own bodies, even their last handfuls of food, if they came upon another person who was hungry or poorly clothed.

Whatever comes into your hands, you choose to hold lightly— and freely release it, if need be, for the sake of love.

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